Tesla Super Charger Talk

Tesla Super Charger Talk

A Tesla Supercharger is a 480-volt direct current fast-charging technology built by American vehicle manufacturer Tesla, Inc. for their all-electric cars. The Supercharger network was introduced in 2012. As of November 8, 2020, Tesla operates over 20,000 Superchargers in over 2,016 stations worldwide (an average of 10 chargers per station). There are 1042 stations in North America, 559 in Europe, and 415 in the Asia/Pacific region. Supercharger stalls have a connector to supply electrical power at 72 kW, 150 kW or 250 kW.
Tesla Model S was the first car to be able to use the network, followed by the Tesla Model X, Tesla Model 3, and Tesla Model Y. Some Tesla cars have free supercharging for life, some have 100-400 kWh per year, some have a single 100-400 kWh credit, and some have a monetary credit. If the car does not have any credit, the user pays with a credit card on file for the electricity used (but in some localities that is not allowed, so Tesla charges for the time spent charging). An idle fee may be charged (depending on the percent occupancy of the Supercharger station) for continuing to be plugged into the Supercharger after charging has been completed.
esla has taken steps to focus use of the Superchargers on making longer journeys. In late 2017, Tesla disallowed commercial, ridesharing company, taxi, and government usage of the public Supercharger network.
Independent of the Superchargers, Tesla also has Tesla destination chargers. As of September 2019, Tesla has distributed 23,963 destination chargers to locations (such as hotels, restaurants, and shopping centers) worldwide. These chargers are slower (typically 22 kW) than Superchargers, and are intended to charge cars over several hours.These chargers are typically free to Tesla drivers who are customers of the business at the location.
Supercharging network
Tesla Supercharger stations allow Tesla vehicles to be fast-charged at the network within roughly an hour or less, and are often located near restaurants with restrooms and other commerce areas.
The average number of Tesla cars per Supercharger stall was 34 in 2016.Cost estimates per station range from US$100,000 in 2013 to US$270,000 in 2015, depending on the number of stalls and other circumstances. Tesla estimates that station equipment lasts 12 years.
Most car charging occurs at home or work, a situation that Tesla has compared to cell phone charging. As of 2014, less than 10% of charging came from Superchargers. In the month of July 2019, Tesla delivered 72 GWh through Superchargers.
Most Supercharger stations are owned by Tesla, but some are owned by fleet operators to charge their Tesla cars, such as taxis. These charger stalls are limited to 60 kW. In December 2017, Tesla changed its terms of service so that any vehicles being used as taxis or for commercial, ride-share, or government purposes were effectively banned from using Superchargers. This ban only applies to vehicles bought after December 15, 2017. Other charging options would be provided for these vehicles.
North America
2012 saw eight initial Supercharger stations around the United States, located at strategic points on the Boston-to-Washington and Los Angeles-to-San Francisco highway corridors. By mid-July 2013, 15 stations were open across the United States, with the number expected to nearly double by the end of the summer. The stations were developed and mass constructed in cooperation with Black & Veatch. Supercharging stations were available in Canada along the Highway 401 corridor between Toronto and Montreal by 2014.
The initial network was built in high-traffic corridors across North America, followed by networks in Europe and Asia in the second half of 2013. The first Supercharger corridor in the US opened with free access in October 2012. This corridor included six stations placed along routes connecting San Francisco, Lake Tahoe, Los Angeles, and Las Vegas. A second corridor was opened in December 2012 along the Northeast megalopolis, connecting Washington, DC, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York City and Boston. This corridor includes three stations in highway rest areas, one in Delaware and two adjacent ones in Connecticut. At some stations, the electricity is paid by local business to attract customers.
As of December 2019, North Dakota, Alaska, and Hawaii are the remaining states without Superchargers. Supercharging stations are planned to be opened in 2020 in all three states. Most of the southern Trans-Canada Highway was covered at the end of 2019.
Europe
In early 2015, the first European Supercharger was upgraded with a ‘solar canopy’ (a carport with solar cells on the roof) in Køge, Denmark. According to the person responsible for Tesla’s Superchargers in the Nordic countries, Christian Marcus, the 12-stall Supercharger in Køge has 300 m2 (3,230 sq ft) solar cells with a projected annual production of about 40 MWh and is equipped with its own battery bank for temporary storage of excess production. Unlike other European Supercharger stations, Tesla has bought the land on which the Køge Supercharger stands. On April 26, 2016, Kostomłoty became the first charger to open in Poland. Tesla opened a grid-connected 2-stall Supercharger at Nürburgring in 2019. There are a few privately operated Supercharger stations such as the one opened on April 27, 2016, in Zarechye, Russia, with 3 stalls.
The European Supercharger network is planned to allow a Model S to drive from the North Cape in Norway to Istanbul or Lisbon. As of July 2019, the Supercharger closest to Istanbul is the one in Vrgorac (Croatia), and the one nearest to Lisbon is Alcacer do Sal. The map of current and planned sites includes every European Union country except Malta and Cyprus, and represents all of the countries in the world in the top 10 of electric vehicle adoption rates.
Asia-Pacific
As of June 2015, Hong Kong had the highest density of Tesla Superchargers in the world, with eight stations with a total of 54 Supercharger stalls, allowing most Model S owners to have a Supercharger within 20 minutes’ drive. Other Superchargers can also be found in People’s Republic of China, Australia, Japan, Macau, New Zealand, South Korea, and Taiwan. Tesla contracts Infigen Energy to supply electricity for its Australian Superchargers.
In 2016, Tesla also announced plans to deploy a nationwide network of Superchargers in India.